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Museum of Science and Industry

Museum of Science and Industry paranormal

Photo by: Marianne Donley
Location submitted by: sdonley on 11/19/2019
DBA Approved: Y


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PANICd#: 2119

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The Museum of Science and Industry (MSI) is a science museum located in Chicago, Illinois, in Jackson Park. It is housed in the former Palace of Fine Arts from the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition.

5700 S Lake Shore Dr
Chicago , IL 60637
Phone: (773) 684-1414
Open to the public: Yes

https://www.msichicago.org/

Lat: 41.792019
Lon: -87.580307

Database Summary:

Demographic Rank: 6
History: 1
Stories: 3
Claims: 5
Evidence: 0
Resources: 6
Retrievals: 839
Vistor Rating: 0.0
Votes: 0

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History

History information is some background and history about the location. This is meant to be a basic summary. Below the history records you will find sources in which you can click on to find out more information. There may be multiple history records per location.


The Museum of Science and Industry (MSI) is a science museum located in Chicago, Illinois, in Jackson Park, in the Hyde Park neighborhood between Lake Michigan and The University of Chicago. It is housed in the former Palace of Fine Arts from the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition. Initially endowed by Julius Rosenwald, the Sears, Roebuck and Company president and philanthropist, it was supported by the Commercial Club of Chicago and opened in 1933 during the Century of Progress Exposition.

Among the museum's exhibits are a full-size replica coal mine, German submarine U-505 captured during World War II, a 3,500-square-foot (330 m2) model railroad, the command module of Apollo 8, and the first diesel-powered streamlined stainless-steel passenger train (Pioneer Zephyr).

David R. Mosena has been president and CEO of the private, non-profit museum since 1998.

The Palace of Fine Arts (also known as the Fine Arts Building) at the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition was designed by Charles B. Atwood for D. H. Burnham & Co. The Palace of Fine Arts displayed paintings, prints, drawing, sculpture, and metal work from around the world.

Unlike the other "White City" buildings, it was constructed with a brick substructure under its plaster facade.

After the World's Fair, it initially housed the Columbian Museum, which evolved into the Field Museum of Natural History. When the Field Museum moved to a new building near downtown Chicago in 1920, the former site was left vacant.

Art Institute of Chicago professor Lorado Taft led a public campaign to restore the building and turn it into another art museum, one devoted to sculpture. The South Park Commissioners (now part of the Chicago Park District) won approval in a referendum to sell $5 million in bonds to pay for restoration costs, hoping to turn the building into a sculpture museum, a technical trade school, and other things. However, after a few years, the building was selected as the site for a new science museum.

At this time, the Commercial Club of Chicago was interested in establishing a science museum in Chicago. Julius Rosenwald, the Sears, Roebuck and Company president and philanthropist, energized his fellow club members by pledging to pay $3 million towards the cost of converting the Palace of Fine Arts (Rosenwald eventually contributed more than $5 million to the project). During its conversion into the MSI, the building's exterior was re-cast in limestone to retain its 1893 Beaux Arts look. The interior was replaced with a new one in Art Moderne style designed by Alfred P. Shaw.

Rosenwald established the museum organization in 1926 but declined to have his name on the building. For the first few years, the museum was often called the Rosenwald Industrial Museum. In 1928, the name of the museum was officially changed to the Museum of Science and Industry. Rosenwald's vision was to create a museum in the style of the Deutsches Museum in Munich, which he had visited in 1911 while in Germany with his family.

Sewell Avery, another businessman, had supported the museum within the Commercial Club and was selected as its first president of the board of directors. The museum conducted a nationwide search for the first director. MSI's Board of Directors selected Waldemar Kaempffert, then the science editor of The New York Times, because he shared Rosenwald's vision.

He assembled the museum's curatorial staff and directed the organization and construction of the exhibits. In order to prepare the museum, Kaempffert and his staff visited the Deutsches Museum in Munich, the Science Museum in Kensington, and the Technical Museum in Vienna, all of which served as models. Kaempffert was instrumental in developing close ties with the science departments of the University of Chicago, which supplied much of the scholarship for the exhibits. Kaempffert resigned in early 1931 amid growing disputes with the second president of the board of directors; they disagreed over the objectivity and neutrality of the exhibits and Kaempffert's management of the staff.

The new Museum of Science and Industry opened to the public in three stages between 1933 and 1940. The first opening ceremony took place during the Century of Progress Exposition. Two of the museum's presidents, a number of curators and other staff members, and exhibits came to MSI from the Century of Progress event.

For years, visitors entered the museum through its original main entrance, but that entrance became no longer large enough to handle an increasing volume of visitors. The newer main entrance is a structure detached from the main museum building, through which visitors descend into an underground area and re-ascend into the main building, similar to the Louvre Pyramid.

In 1983, due to increased attendance, the museum started construction of its underground parking lot, located in three underground levels below the front lawn. Construction of the underground parking lot was finished in the 1990s.

For over 55 years, admission to the MSI was free. Fees were first charged in the early 1990s, with general admission rates increasing from $13 in 2008 to $18 in 2015. Many "free days"—for Illinois residents only—are offered throughout the year. On October 3, 2019, the museum announced that it intends to change its name to the Kenneth C. Griffin Museum of Science and Industry after a donation of $125 million from Chicago billionaire Kenneth C. Griffin. It is the largest single gift in the museum's history,[8][9] effectively doubling its endowment. However, president and chief executive officer David Mosena said the formal name change could take some time, due to the complexity of the process. He also said part of the gift will go into funding "a state-of-the-art digital gallery and performance space that will be the only experience of its kind in North America."

Added by: sdonley on 12/09/2019 DB#:551
Source(s):
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Museum_of_Science_an...


Stories

Stories are just that. Stories and personal accounts that have been reported about the location.


There are many who believe that the phantom has, and does, appear somewhat regularly on a veranda that spans the back of the Museum of Science and Industry. This wide stone area is at the bottom of the steps leading into the rear entrance of the museum and the apparition that appears here is only visible from the site of the Clarence Darrow Memorial Bridge, just across the lagoon. The ghost is reportedly seen dressed in a suit, hat and overcoat and bears a striking resemblance to the attorney. The figure is reported to stand and stare out across the water before disappearing.

Over the years, it has been sighted by literally dozens of people, although none of them have ever gotten close enough to the specter to see it clearly. Whenever it is approached ---- usually by would-be “ghost busters” who are intent on capturing it somehow --- the figure simply vanishes.

Added by: sdonley on 12/09/2019 DB#:1549
Source(s):
http://troytaylorbooks.blogspot.com/2013/03/claren...


One of the Museum of Science and Industry’s most popular exhibits is also the source of a noteworthy haunting. Reportedly, the World War II-era commander of the Museum’s German U-505 submarine shot himself on board, right in front of his crew. For the brave of heart, the Museum offers 25-minute on-board tours, which depart every 15 minutes. Complete with dramatic lighting and sound effects, this tour is highly immersive, and includes a Q&A session, where you can get all your ghostly questions answered.

Added by: sdonley on 12/09/2019 DB#:1550
Source(s):
https://www.choosechicago.com/blog/architecture-hi...


Johnson confirmed with me that museums, along with hotels, hospitals, sanitariums, funeral homes and graveyards, are popular stomping grounds for ghosts. And the Museum of Science and Industry is no stranger to spooky phantoms. There have been ghost sightings in and around the museum, most notably by the German submarine U-505 exhibit. Johnson says that the second commander committed suicide by "shooting himself in the head in front of his crew." Johnson has heard reports from people claiming to hear footsteps around the ship and having the feeling of a ghostly presence surrounding them. That ghastly tale is worth admission, in my opinion. If you ain’t 'fraid of no ghosts, of course.

Added by: sdonley on 12/09/2019 DB#:1551
Source(s):
https://www.chicagotribune.com/redeye/redeye-chica...


Paranormal Claims

Here are the paranormal claims for this location. These have been found through Internet research, reports from members, or reports from personal interviews. To add a claim, please contact PANICd.com, and we will review and add your information.


Claim # Added Added By Claim
3227 12/09/2019 sdonley The apparition of a little girl has been seen by the blue stairs.
3228 12/09/2019 sdonley Strange sounds and footsteps have been heard around the submarine display.
3229 12/09/2019 sdonley Voices and whispers have been reported around the train display.
3230 12/09/2019 sdonley The apparition of a man in a derby hat has been seen in the old store display area and walking over the bridge by the lagoon, that is believed to be H.H. Holmes.
3231 12/09/2019 sdonley The apparition of a man resembling Clarence Darrow has been witnessed on the back steps of the building and within the building.

Paranormal Evidence

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Additional Resources

This is a collection of Internet resources for this location. This section will house links to other websites that contain information related to history, claims, investigations, or even the location's website.


Wikipedia Entry
Added: 12/09/2019 By: sdonley
Wikipedia entry for this location.
American Hauntings: Clarence Darrow: Return from the Grave?
Added: 12/09/2019 By: sdonley
Information about the location, see link for details.
8 haunted Chicago sights you probably didn't know about | Choose Chicago
Added: 12/09/2019 By: sdonley
Information about the location, see link for details.
Scaring up the most haunted places in Chicago – WISCH LIST
Added: 12/09/2019 By: sdonley
Information about the location, see link for details.
Haunted Chicago spots you probably didn't know about - RedEye Chicago
Added: 12/09/2019 By: sdonley
Information about the location, see link for details.
The Haunted Palace: Ghosts and Hauntings of the Museum of Science and Industry | Chicago Hauntings Ghost Tours
Added: 12/09/2019 By: sdonley
Information about the location, see link for details.

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